Hunting-License.org’s Reasons to Consider Crossbow Hunting

hunting-license.org blog: Hunting-License.org’s Reasons to Consider Crossbow Hunting

Learning how to use a crossbow properly can take time and a lot of trial and error. That is why many hunters simply forego trying to use the crossbow and pick up a rifle instead. However, learning to use a crossbow does have its advantages. If you are considering purchasing a crossbow or compound bow, here are some reasons to carry out your purchase courtesy of the team at Hunting-License.org.

Ease of Use

Despite its simple appearance, the crossbow is a fairly accurate weapon. With practice, anyone can become proficient with the crossbow, especially when you practice hunting game from multiple distances. It takes a while to learn about the dynamics and limitations of the crossbow, but most hunters find that it is easier to use than a compound bow.

Shot Setup

Whereas shooting weapons like rifles can involve loading ammunition in the truck and keeping the safety on until you are ready to fire, hunters must reload crossbows and compound bows after each shot. However, loading a bow can be easier than pushing shells into a clip. Hunters pull back the crossbow string sans arrow, typically with assistance from a crank or cocking harness. Once the string is in position, hunters can load the arrow and take aim. Like firearms, crossbows are relatively safe since the archer must take the safety off to pull the trigger. The crossbow’s mechanism of action is very similar to a rifle, so if you feel comfortable using a firearm while hunting then you will definitely want to try a crossbow. With compound bows, the arrow is in place as the hunter draws back the string. Typically, compound bows are set manually like standard bows but there are cocking devices that can help archers.

Mass Weight & Draw Weight

If weight is an issue, you may enjoy a compound bow. Materials used to make modern compound bows are strong but lightweight. Compound bows require between 10 and 100 pounds of draw weight to fire an arrow at 150 to 370 feet per second. However, unlike standard bows that more gain potential force the further you draw the string, the draw required to reach the ideal weight on crossbows occurs within only a few inches.

Crossbows tend to be two to three times heavier in mass weight compared to compound bows. Crossbows also require a higher draw weight to generate the same speed and energy of a compound bow. However, archers with arthritis may prefer the shooting and loading features of the crossbow. Since crossbows utilize accessories and hold the draw until fired, hunters may feel they are putting in less work with a crossbow over a compound bow. If you have serious upper body impairments, Hunting-License.org recommends buying a crossbow with a cocking device to help with drawing.

Accuracy

A scope can help you aim if you struggle with accuracy. Crossbow scopes are similar to riflescopes and allow hunters to adjust for distance. One click is typically a 10-yard difference, but hunters can opt for scopes that mirror their abilities. The experts at Hunting-License.org recommend using a scope when practicing to improve accuracy. Many scopes illuminate, making it easier to hunt once the sun goes down.

Consider a Crossbow

In short, there are numerous advantages of using a crossbow instead of a rifle or compound bow. The crossbow’s light weight and easy loading features make it a good compromise for a beginner who doesn’t have much time to practice archery. With the aid of a scope, many archers will find that the crossbow is an amazingly effective game hunting tool. The next time you go on a hunting trip, the Hunting-License.org team suggests carrying a crossbow along for extra fun.